Archive for 2010

Carbs—not fat—are the biggest problem with America’s diet?

by Ed Bruske, via Grist.org,

Just in time for the holiday-season blizzard of baked goods comes the news that carbohydrates—not fat—are more likely to be responsible for obesity, diabetes, heart disease, and the other ills of modern civilization. The Los Angeles Times has a detailed report on the growing body of scientific evidence that until now has been treated as nutritional poison: Fat is good, carbs are bad.

Read the rest of this feature »

Food Labels: Do You Know What’s in Your Food?

by Kristin Kirkpatrick, MS., RD, LD, via The Huffington Post,

Think back to what you had for dinner last night. Try to remember everything on your plate—the protein, the carbohydrates and the fat. Now ask yourself—where did it all come from? If you had a vegetable, do you know if it came from a farm near your house or perhaps did it travel hundreds, even thousands of miles to make it into your grocery store? If you had chicken, do you know if it grazed outdoors or was locked up? If your food came from a box, did you read the label first and if so, did you understand all the ingredients? The fact is most of us either don’t know or don’t want to know where our food comes from. To many of us, food is something that can be found in a box, thrown in the microwave and consumed in front of the TV.

Read the rest of this feature »

The Accidental Kids’ Food Activist

The Accidental Kids’ Food Activist

You might have heard the name Ed Bruske. He is a prominent feature on the sustainable food landscape—a Washington, DC, blogger, writer, chef and gardener whose articles have appeared in the Washington Post, Martha Stewart Living and Edible Chesapeake. Ed’s work in sustainable gardening has been featured in People magazine as well as in popular food blogs such as Chow and Seriously Good, and he has made numerous appearances on television and radio.

Read the rest of this feature »

A Breakthrough Discovery on the Causes of Autism

by Dr. Mark Hyman, via The Huffington Post,

Imagine being the parent of a young child who is not acting normally and being told by your doctor that your child has autism, that there is no known cause, and there is no known treatment except, perhaps, some behavioral therapy. That is exactly what Jackson’s parents were told as their 22-month-old son regressed into the non-verbal psychic prison of social withdrawal, disconnection, and repetitive behaviors typical of autism.

Read the rest of this feature »

Lessons from Ann Cooper’s school-food revolution

by Ed Bruske, via Grist.org,

Ann Cooper is conducting a clinic in Boulder on how to rescue school food. Is anyone paying attention?

In remaking the lunch line in Boulder schools, Cooper has revealed the federally subsidized school meals program as living somewhere in the Stone Age. Not merely underfunded, school kitchens are woefully under-managed and under-equipped to function in a digital age. No wonder they constantly run in the red. Schools are incapable of serving real food any more because they are mired in lack of imagination, lack of will, and above all, lack of professional know-how when it comes to producing meals with recognizable whole ingredients.

Read the rest of this feature »

Organically Raised: A Hip and Healthy Guide for Parents

Organically Raised: A Hip and Healthy Guide for Parents

The cookbook Organically Raised: Conscious Cooking for Babies and Toddlers is a great solution for the growing number of parents today concerned about what to feed their children—especially young children, who can be even more susceptible to food allergies. The book’s author, Anni Daulter, is a former social worker and social consciousness professor, a mother, a professional cook, and the founder of Bohemian Baby Food—at the time of its founding, the only organic, fresh baby food available on the market.

Read the rest of this feature »

USDA removes major block to Michelle Obama’s salad-bar program

by Ed Bruske, via Grist.org,

First Lady Michelle Obama announced last week that a new public-private partnership, Let’s Move Salad Bars to Schools, would make it possible for as many as 6,000 salad bars to be installed in U.S. school cafeterias at an estimated cost of $15 million. Contrary to what hundreds of irate commenters directed to Grist from a link by the Drudge Report feared, the salad bars will not be mandatory lunchtime eating for the nation’s youngsters, not taxpayer-funded. If parents like Sarah Palin want their kids to eat cookies for lunch, no one is going to stop them.

Read the rest of this feature »

Picasso’s Message to Parents

“Each second we live is a new and unique moment of the universe, a moment that will never be again. And what do we teach our children? We teach them that two and two make four, and that Paris is the capital of France. When will we also teach them what they are? We should say to each of them: Do you know what you are? You are a marvel. You are unique. In all the years that have passed, there has never been another child like you. Your legs, your arms, your clever fingers, the way you move. You may become a Shakespeare, a Michelangelo, a Beethoven. You have the capacity for anything. Yes, you are a marvel. And when you grow up, can you then harm another who is, like you, a marvel? You must work, we must all work, to make the world worthy of its children.” —Pablo Picasso

Doctor Prescribes Nutrition for Kids’ Health

According to Carolyn Dean, MD, ND, life-threatening diseases such as diabetes once consigned to adults are becoming alarmingly common in childhood. Asthma, allergies, endocrine irregularities, behavioral problems and a host of other maladies in children have reached epidemic proportions. Nonetheless, Dr. Dean argues, prevention and reversal are possible with sound nutrition and common sense.

Austin, Texas (Vocus/PRWEB) December 01, 2010—Dr. Dean’s new booklet, Kids’ Health—A Doctor’s Guide for Parents, published by Better Nutrition magazine, offers clear-cut guidelines for achieving, maintaining or restoring children’s health.

Read the rest of this feature »

Parents Tell Supermarket: No TV Ads on Grocery Store Shelves

by Brie Cadman, via Change.org,

Picture this: while strolling down the supermarket aisle, mentally going through a grocery list, a voice calls out from a small screen in front of you. It’s a TV ad, beckoning you to purchase a sugary cereal or to opt for a mac-n-cheese dinner. If food marketers have their way, this scene may become reality in grocery stores across the nation.

Read the rest of this feature »

QR Code Business Card